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New Suffolk

New Suffolk
The coastal hamlet of New Suffolk may be very tiny, but it has big-time views of the Peconic Bay.

Located south of Cutchogue, New Suffolk is a treasure. National Geographic dubs it “one of America's most charming, out-of-the-way towns.” People who crave light – and who doesn't – will be enticed by the National Weather Service's description of New Suffolk as “the sunniest spot in all of New York State.”

Tiny New Suffolk, set below Cutchogue on North Fork, boasts some very big vistas. National Geographic called it “one of America's most charming, out-of-the-way towns,” for its historic waterfront location, looking out across Peconic Bay to Robins Island. People are drawn to New Suffolk for the light, the water, and for the the quaint hamlet atmosphere. The small, two-room red schoolhouse is not just a historic site, but still operates as a school. New Suffolk retains a strong sense community – its residents clubbed together to preserve the waterfront, and are famous for hosting a lively Fourth of July Parade and community barbecues that bigger towns would be proud of.

New Suffolk history

New Suffolk’s origins lie in its harbor and waterfront. In the 17th century this area was known as Booth’s Neck and by the 18th century it had become a busy port called Robin’s Island Neck. In the 19th and early 20th centuries oyster and scallop farming thrived here. These waters were also used by the US Navy to trial its first submarine, the USS Holland, and a submarine base was located in New Suffolk between 1899 and 1905. You can still see a historic marker commemorating the community’s role as the first submarine base.

New Suffolk’s 3.4 acres of waterfront declined towards the end of the 20th century, and there were many years of uncertainty. Now, however, the whole area is being restored and revived as a community-owned venture, which is run as the New Suffolk Waterfront Fund. There’s a community garden, and the open spaces and scenic vistas are protected. Though Hurricane Sandy in 2012 damaged the coastline, New Suffolk is back on its feet, and the iconic waterside restaurant Galley Ho has been reopened as Case’s Place.

New Suffolk things to do

As you take the scenic drive along the causeway to the waterfront, you’ll be struck by the natural beauty that surrounds this small hamlet. The golden sands of New Suffolk Beach run along 200 feet of the Peconic Bay. It’s a perfect spot for fishing, jet and water-skiing, and sailing (you need a permit for the boat launch). There’s a playground and lifeguards are on duty during the summer.

New Suffolk has one of the oldest marinas in Eastern Long Island. New Suffolk Shipyard

is a charming, family-owned, full-service marina, which is the focus for many summer events.  On Wednesday evenings, the Peconic Bay Sailing Association hosts races, which are a stunning sight to watch and even more fun to take part in. Bay access is possible at the marinas at Schoolhouse Creek and Cutchogue Harbor.

New Suffolk restaurants

Opened in 1993, Legends lives up to its name in New Suffolk. It serves a refined fine-dining menu in both their elegant dining room and classic bar. Ingredients are sourced from the Long Island farmsteads and from the surrounding waters, though the imaginative flavor combinations show influences from further afield. The menu changes regularly but expect to find some twists on the classics. You may see New Orleans-style shrimp with crab, Cuban-style pork shank with black bean and corn salsa or some spicy Asian touches in the vegetarian stir-fries.

Right on New Suffolk’s waterside, and a central part of the hamlet’s preservation project, is the former site of the Galley Ho restaurant, which was irreparably damaged during Hurricane Sandy. Like a phoenix from the ashes, a new restaurant has been created on the site, named Case’s Place. With a stunning waterside location and wide terrace, and with its historic setting, this restaurant is a must-visit in New Suffolk — and the perfect spot from which to watch the summer boat races. The mood here is modest and family friendly, and they keep the menu simple and focused on seafood, with local clams, shrimp and the catch of the day all good choices. Favorites include crab cakes and oysters on the half-shell.

New Suffolk shopping

As a small hamlet of 200 people, commerce in New Suffolk is small and low-key — though you’re well placed to reach some of the larger conurbations on North Fork. However, before looking elsewhere, first look to New Suffolk’s own Summer Girl, a great little store that stocks a superb selection, including jewelry and children’s gifts, all at very reasonable prices.

New Suffolk real estate

Wherever your home is in New Suffolk, you’re never far from secluded bayside restaurants and white sandy beaches, making the hamlet appealing to long-term residents in search of tranquility as well as seasonal boaters and vacationers. Bayfront homes right by the beach are coveted for their stunning, uninterrupted views out to Robins Island. Opt for a harbor-side property instead, and New Suffolk real estate can offer a deep-water dock with direct access to Cutchogue Harbor so you can accommodate your boats right at your New Suffolk home.

The small network of streets that form the hamlet itself, offer quaint cottages, each set on a parcel of land, that make for idyllic, cozy summer rentals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The coastal hamlet of New Suffolk may be very tiny, but it has big-time views of the Peconic Bay.
Located south of Cutchogue, New Suffolk is a treasure. National Geographic dubs it “one of America's most charming, out-of-the-way towns.” People who crave light – and who doesn't – will be enticed by the National Weather Service's description of New Suffolk as “the sunniest spot in all of New York State.”

Tiny New Suffolk, set below Cutchogue on North Fork, boasts some very big vistas. National Geographic called it “one of America's most charming, out-of-the-way towns,” for its historic waterfront location, looking out across Peconic Bay to Robins Island. People are drawn to New Suffolk for the light, the water, and for the the quaint hamlet atmosphere. The small, two-room red schoolhouse is not just a historic site, but still operates as a school. New Suffolk retains a strong sense community – its residents clubbed together to preserve the waterfront, and are famous for hosting a lively Fourth of July Parade and community barbecues that bigger towns would be proud of.

New Suffolk history

New Suffolk’s origins lie in its harbor and waterfront. In the 17th century this area was known as Booth’s Neck and by the 18th century it had become a busy port called Robin’s Island Neck. In the 19th and early 20th centuries oyster and scallop farming thrived here. These waters were also used by the US Navy to trial its first submarine, the USS Holland, and a submarine base was located in New Suffolk between 1899 and 1905. You can still see a historic marker commemorating the community’s role as the first submarine base.

New Suffolk’s 3.4 acres of waterfront declined towards the end of the 20th century, and there were many years of uncertainty. Now, however, the whole area is being restored and revived as a community-owned venture, which is run as the New Suffolk Waterfront Fund. There’s a community garden, and the open spaces and scenic vistas are protected. Though Hurricane Sandy in 2012 damaged the coastline, New Suffolk is back on its feet, and the iconic waterside restaurant Galley Ho has been reopened as Case’s Place.

New Suffolk things to do

As you take the scenic drive along the causeway to the waterfront, you’ll be struck by the natural beauty that surrounds this small hamlet. The golden sands of New Suffolk Beach run along 200 feet of the Peconic Bay. It’s a perfect spot for fishing, jet and water-skiing, and sailing (you need a permit for the boat launch). There’s a playground and lifeguards are on duty during the summer.

New Suffolk has one of the oldest marinas in Eastern Long Island. New Suffolk Shipyard

is a charming, family-owned, full-service marina, which is the focus for many summer events.  On Wednesday evenings, the Peconic Bay Sailing Association hosts races, which are a stunning sight to watch and even more fun to take part in. Bay access is possible at the marinas at Schoolhouse Creek and Cutchogue Harbor.

New Suffolk restaurants

Opened in 1993, Legends lives up to its name in New Suffolk. It serves a refined fine-dining menu in both their elegant dining room and classic bar. Ingredients are sourced from the Long Island farmsteads and from the surrounding waters, though the imaginative flavor combinations show influences from further afield. The menu changes regularly but expect to find some twists on the classics. You may see New Orleans-style shrimp with crab, Cuban-style pork shank with black bean and corn salsa or some spicy Asian touches in the vegetarian stir-fries.

Right on New Suffolk’s waterside, and a central part of the hamlet’s preservation project, is the former site of the Galley Ho restaurant, which was irreparably damaged during Hurricane Sandy. Like a phoenix from the ashes, a new restaurant has been created on the site, named Case’s Place. With a stunning waterside location and wide terrace, and with its historic setting, this restaurant is a must-visit in New Suffolk — and the perfect spot from which to watch the summer boat races. The mood here is modest and family friendly, and they keep the menu simple and focused on seafood, with local clams, shrimp and the catch of the day all good choices. Favorites include crab cakes and oysters on the half-shell.

New Suffolk shopping

As a small hamlet of 200 people, commerce in New Suffolk is small and low-key — though you’re well placed to reach some of the larger conurbations on North Fork. However, before looking elsewhere, first look to New Suffolk’s own Summer Girl, a great little store that stocks a superb selection, including jewelry and children’s gifts, all at very reasonable prices.

New Suffolk real estate

Wherever your home is in New Suffolk, you’re never far from secluded bayside restaurants and white sandy beaches, making the hamlet appealing to long-term residents in search of tranquility as well as seasonal boaters and vacationers. Bayfront homes right by the beach are coveted for their stunning, uninterrupted views out to Robins Island. Opt for a harbor-side property instead, and New Suffolk real estate can offer a deep-water dock with direct access to Cutchogue Harbor so you can accommodate your boats right at your New Suffolk home.

The small network of streets that form the hamlet itself, offer quaint cottages, each set on a parcel of land, that make for idyllic, cozy summer rentals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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