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Get to know Kahala

Kahala is like a Cinderella story. Once an area dominated by farmlands, it’s now the quintessential definition of luxury island living. Think secluded beaches, spacious estates, and unparalleled privacy. You won’t find throngs of people here. It’s no wonder Kahala is a famous escape for pleasure and leisure. Golfers will enjoy sweeping seaside vistas at the Waialae Country Club, which also plays host to the annual Sony Open. In the fall, the state’s most prestigious culinary event, the Hawaii Food & Wine Fest, makes a stop in town with a show-stopping list of local, national, and international celebrity chefs. If you’re a patron of the arts, you may be delighted to know that Kahala was home to American heiress and philanthropist, Doris Duke, who owned the largest private collection of Islamic arts. Now called Shangri La Museum, her estate and stunning pieces are on view to the public.
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Living on Oahu

Nicknamed the Gathering Place, Oahu is for most visitors the gateway to the Hawaiian Islands. Arrival at the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport, named for Hawaii's long-serving U.S. senator, brings dazzling views of the Honolulu skyline and famed Waikiki Beach, the dramatic crater of Diamond Head, and the Ko'olau Range, a lush volcanic ridge commonly referred to as "the Pali." The island's verdant Leeward and Windward coasts are dotted by quiet rural communities and seldom-trodden beaches, and the windswept North Shore, with its renowned waves and 7 miles of sand, is renowned as the birthplace of surfing. In Honolulu, in contrast, is a bustling business hub of 400,000 people that's also home to vibrant shopping, dining, and arts scenes.

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