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23 Beekman Place

Apt. PH
East 50th Street and East 51st Street
Rental
Per Month $14,000

This home has been rented

Subway Lines
Subway number 6 Subway number E Subway number M
Nearby Subway Stations
Subway number 6 3rd Ave - 53rd St
Subway number E 3rd Ave - 53rd St
Subway number M 3rd Ave - 53rd St
Essentials
Price $14,000
Type Rental Building
Bedrooms 3
Bathrooms 3
Rooms 7
Approx. Sq. Ft. 3,000
Exposure N, S, E & W
Key Features
Penthouse
Balcony
Terrace
Elevator
Pet Friendly
Full River View
Central Air
Dishwasher
Excellent Light
Modern Kitchen
Renovated Bathroom
Security System
Wood-Burning Fireplace

Ultra chic triplex penthouse designed by famed architect, Paul Rudolph. This extraordinary residence encompasses the top three and a half floors of the iconic "Paul Rudolph Townhouse" at 23 Beekman Place, and was once the architect's personal home.
Encompassing over 3,000 square feet, the penthouse boasts three bedrooms, three bathrooms, four terraces, and expansive entertaining space staggered on multiple levels, one of the modernist architect's trademark designs.
The double-height living room boasts a wood burning fireplace and floor to ceiling picture windows showcasing unobstructed views of the East River, and the impressive chef's kitchen includes two Subzero refrigerators, a Bosch dishwasher and a Gaggenau six burner stove.
The penthouse has been critically acclaimed as one of most amazing pieces of modern urban domestic architecture and has earned two awards from the American Institute of Architecture. Complete with cantilevered floors, bridges, floating stairs, and pergolas, this penthouse embodies Rudolph's trademark structural complexity and is simply not to be missed!

Beekman
Living in Beekman
This neighborhood where Irving Berlin once resided, is composed of beautiful townhouses and grand co-ops situated upon just a few square blocks. Because of its size, the number of Beekman Place apartments for sale at any one time, whether co-op or condo, is limited — but the Beekman area is worth the wait! The neighborhood centers on Beekman Place, which is two blocks long, lined with grand buildings such as One Beekman Place, a co-op with a garage and an Olympic pool. In fiction, that East Side co-op was home to the madcap Auntie Mame; in fact, it contains what many believe to be New York City’s grandest and best apartments.
Explore Beekman
23 Beekman Place
Paul Rudolph House, The
The nine-story townhouse at 23 Beekman Place was designed as a multi-residence building, comprising three duplex apartments and an architecturally acclaimed quadruplex penthouse designed by Paul Rudolph. Paul Rudolph was one of the most revered and innovative American architects of the 20th century. He studied under Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus, and was trained at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in the 1940s. From 1958 to 1965, Rudolph served as chairman of the Department of Architecture at Yale University, where he designed the famed Art and Architecture Building, now called Paul Rudolph Hall. In NYC, relatively few buildings have been designed and built by architects for their own use. Paul Rudolph was associated with 23 Beekman Place for more than 35 years, from 1961 until his death in 1997. He purchased the building in 1976, and between 1977 and 1982, Rudolph added the multi-story, cantilevered steel-and-glass penthouse atop a five-story, neo-Georgian-style masonry structure. Through the years, Rudolph relentlessly altered its design and ultimately created a significant and highly personal example of his work.
Details
Prewar
Built in 1930
7 floors
4 units
Elevator
Pet friendly
Amenities
Alarm system
Common storage

This home has been rented

23 Beekman Place
Apt. PH
East 50th Street and East 51st Street
Rental
Essentials
Price $14,000
Type Rental Building
Bedrooms 3
Bathrooms 3
Rooms 7
Approx. Sq. Ft. 3,000
Exposure N, S, E & W

Ultra chic triplex penthouse designed by famed architect, Paul Rudolph. This extraordinary residence encompasses the top three and a half floors of the iconic "Paul Rudolph Townhouse" at 23 Beekman Place, and was once the architect's personal home.
Encompassing over 3,000 square feet, the penthouse boasts three bedrooms, three bathrooms, four terraces, and expansive entertaining space staggered on multiple levels, one of the modernist architect's trademark designs.
The double-height living room boasts a wood burning fireplace and floor to ceiling picture windows showcasing unobstructed views of the East River, and the impressive chef's kitchen includes two Subzero refrigerators, a Bosch dishwasher and a Gaggenau six burner stove.
The penthouse has been critically acclaimed as one of most amazing pieces of modern urban domestic architecture and has earned two awards from the American Institute of Architecture. Complete with cantilevered floors, bridges, floating stairs, and pergolas, this penthouse embodies Rudolph's trademark structural complexity and is simply not to be missed!

Penthouse
Balcony
Terrace
Elevator
Pet Friendly
Full River View
Central Air
Dishwasher
Excellent Light
Modern Kitchen
Renovated Bathroom
Security System
Wood-Burning Fireplace
Beekman
Living in Beekman
This neighborhood where Irving Berlin once resided, is composed of beautiful townhouses and grand co-ops situated upon just a few square blocks. Because of its size, the number of Beekman Place apartments for sale at any one time, whether co-op or condo, is limited — but the Beekman area is worth the wait! The neighborhood centers on Beekman Place, which is two blocks long, lined with grand buildings such as One Beekman Place, a co-op with a garage and an Olympic pool. In fiction, that East Side co-op was home to the madcap Auntie Mame; in fact, it contains what many believe to be New York City’s grandest and best apartments.
Explore Beekman
Subway Lines
Subway number 6 Subway number E Subway number M
Nearby Subway Stations
Subway number 6 3rd Ave - 53rd St
Subway number E 3rd Ave - 53rd St
Subway number M 3rd Ave - 53rd St
23 Beekman Place
Paul Rudolph House, The
The nine-story townhouse at 23 Beekman Place was designed as a multi-residence building, comprising three duplex apartments and an architecturally acclaimed quadruplex penthouse designed by Paul Rudolph. Paul Rudolph was one of the most revered and innovative American architects of the 20th century. He studied under Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus, and was trained at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in the 1940s. From 1958 to 1965, Rudolph served as chairman of the Department of Architecture at Yale University, where he designed the famed Art and Architecture Building, now called Paul Rudolph Hall. In NYC, relatively few buildings have been designed and built by architects for their own use. Paul Rudolph was associated with 23 Beekman Place for more than 35 years, from 1961 until his death in 1997. He purchased the building in 1976, and between 1977 and 1982, Rudolph added the multi-story, cantilevered steel-and-glass penthouse atop a five-story, neo-Georgian-style masonry structure. Through the years, Rudolph relentlessly altered its design and ultimately created a significant and highly personal example of his work.
Details
Prewar
Built in 1930
7 floors
4 units
Elevator
Pet friendly
Amenities
Alarm system
Common storage