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Get to know Gramercy

What is the key to Gramercy’s alluring aura? It could be its central location within short distances of multiple subway and bus stops. Or maybe it has to do with the culture — the performing arts venues and the countless excellent restaurants found around every corner. Perhaps still, people are drawn by the history of famous residents, including icons of the stage, page, and screen. All are plausible, but everything comes back to the park in the end. Gramercy Park is literally held under lock-and-key, only accessible to those living in the immediately surrounding buildings, creating an unmistakable air of grandeur. However, it certainly helps that the exquisite townhouses and apartment buildings that border the renowned private square rise to meet its splendor, showing off celebrated 19th-century architectural styles. The Gramercy Park Historic District and local advocates help keep everything preserved, creating a neighborhood that feels the exact right amount of quaint.

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Gramercy Commerce & Culture

Of all the notable names to hold the key to Gramercy Park, Edwin Booth — often regarded as the finest stage actor to portray Hamlet — perhaps looms largest. After all, there’s a statue of him in there. Booth also founded The Players out of his 16 Gramercy Park mansion, creating a social club and pseudo-museum of American and British theater that persists today. Lexington Avenue and Irving Place exist because of Gramercy Park but will never meet because of it — despite multiple failed plans to link them, including via cable car. Instead, the twin thoroughfares, along with help from Third and Park avenues, boost the area’s appeal with a host of fantastic eateries. Sample cuisines from the Americas, Europe, and Asia without even changing zip codes. Anything Gramercy lacks can only be attributed to its relatively small size. Luckily, anything missing is easily found nearby in Union Square, Flatiron, and the East Village.