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Overview


Uptown, Dyckman Street to the northern tip of Manhattan, Harlem River to Hudson River.

Inwood is the purported site of Peter Minuit’s purchase of Manhattan from the Lenape Indians — one of the most famous real estate transactions in history. Inwood offers affordable co-ops, free-standing single-family homes and, most recently, luxury condos. Townhouses and Art Deco apartment buildings lie to the west of Broadway, and to the East are rental housing and a vibrant street life. With an influx of downtowners seeking quiet and value, Inwood has a developing arts community, a fun and growing nightlife and a variety of new restaurants.

Living in Inwood

Moments of serenity are in abundant supply in Inwood. Inwood Hill Park covers 196 acres with natural old-growth woodland and Manhattan’s last salt marsh. It provides an unparalleled chance to see what the Manhattan Isle was like centuries ago.

The pace of life is slower here, with neighbors greeting one another along Inwood’s leafy streets. The neighborhood sits between the Harlem and Hudson rivers, bounded to the south by Washington Heights. Although it’s at the very tip of Manhattan, Inwood is only a half hour subway ride to Times Square on the express A train. Thus while Inwood feels pleasantly secluded, it’s also well-connected to all the 24-hour action of the city.

The neighborhood’s varied blend of residents includes a number of working artists. You may hear stray notes drifting out the window from New York’s next up-and-coming rock band, or view painters honing their craft with the inspiring Hudson River landscapes.

Inwood real estate

Luxury condos have only recently started to sprout up in Inwood, to meet the increased housing demand as the area grows in profile among downtowners. There’s a harmonious blend of property styles represented in Inwood real estate. These include contemporary co-ops and detached single family homes. Art Deco apartment buildings sit to the west of Broadway, along with stately townhouses. And to Broadway’s east there’s a good stock of rental housing.

Most Inwood apartments are pre-war and offer well-preserved period details including working fireplaces, interior gardens and cornicing. Inwood is low-density, with numerous parks occupying its one and a half square miles of space. Zoning restrictions limited buildings to seven stories for decades, and as a result, older buildings are only five or six stories in height, with just a few new condo developments bucking this trend.

Inwood history

It’s said that Peter Minuit purchased Manhattan from the Lenape Native Americans for 60 Dutch guilders in 1626. A plaque in Inwood Hill Park marks the spot of this famous transaction. Inwood remained primarily rural until the 20th century, with its vast expanses of woodland still visible today. The IRT Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line, today’s 1 train,  arrived in the neighborhood in 1906. With this new lifeline into the neighborhood, the development of new apartment buildings began and the area around Broadway grew. Many of these grand Art Deco style buildings remain today.

Inwood restaurants

Inwood’s restaurant row is near the Dyckman Street stop at the northern tip of Fort Tryon Park. Here you’ll find a strip of cafés and restaurants, with seating spilling out onto the pavement. Lively music and intoxicating aromas lure in passers-by. Mamajuana Café is king of this Inwood Plaza dining scene, dishing up tasty Latin fare. Sink back into plush sofas and indulge in a mojito while enjoying the colorful ambiance.

Mamasushi, its sister venue, serves up Japanese-Mexican fusion cuisine, like shrimp tempura rolls topped with sweet plantain and avocado. Corcho Wine Room, Il Sole and Papasito Mexican Grill & Agave Bar are all located on this same stretch.

Off the main Dyckman strip sits coffee and wine bar Beans and Vines with its cozy exposed brick and dark wood interior. Whether you’re in the mood for old-fashioned Greek diner fare, Chinese delivery or tapas, you’ll easily find it in this neighborhood.

Inwood attractions

The main attraction in Inwood is its sprawling park, with caves that once housed prehistoric inhabitants. There’s a network of trails to follow in the forest, and its pristine salt marsh habitat make it a mecca for birdwatchers. This is one of the best spots in the city to spy a bald eagle soaring through the air, or hear a Screech Owl hooting in the woods. Additional features of Inwood Hill Park include tennis courts, handball courts, baseball diamonds and children’s playgrounds. In the summer, residents relax on the grassy slopes with a picnic and bottle of wine for free concerts and Shakespeare in the Park performances.

Inwood’s also home to the last remaining Dutch colonial farmhouse in Manhattan, which sits at Broadway and 204th Street. The Dyckman Farmhouse Museum was built in 1784 and serves as a reminder of the island’s rich history.

Inwood shopping

Broadway is Inwood’s main shopping thoroughfare. Mom-and-pop shops sit next to regional and international chains, pharmacies and coffee shops. There’s also a row of brand-name businesses on Dyckman Street. The Inwood Farmer’s Market, which takes place on Isham Street every Saturday throughout the year, is a local highlight. It draws in residents for its array of farm-fresh produce, local honey, eggs, meat and wild-caught fish. Bizcocho de Colores is another neighborhood favorite. This family-run bakery is famed for its tres leches cake and friendly service.

Inwood nightlife

Like its dining scene, the majority of Inwood’s nightlife is located in and around bustling Dyckman Street. The Dyckman Strip is the go-to destination for thumping Latin nightclubs and upscale wine bars alike. After dark, Mamajuana Café heats up with live music and a lengthy drinks menu.  

Dyckman Bar sits at the other end of the strip, with fruity cocktails served in mason jars or pitchers. There’s a seasonal cocktail menu, happy hour and a welcoming dance floor. The Inwood Local’s beer garden offers an ideal location to sip on craft beer or listen to live music, just a stone’s throw from Isham Park. And Inwood’s Irish legacy is still intact thanks to the smattering of pubs that remain in the neighborhood, including the Liffy II. Karaoke, soft lighting and drink specials draw in a local crowd to this neighborhood favorite.

What's In The Area: Inwood

Local tips and information for going out in the Inwood from The Corcoran Group. Explore dining, shopping and nightlife.

All Inwood tips

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