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Get to know Brooklyn Heights

Brooklyn Heights is situated on a plateau, one of the rare New York neighborhoods that actually earns its elevation-related name. In the 1820s, investors began buying lots in the area, drawn by its proximity (by ferry) to downtown Manhattan. Considered first to be a “country retreat,” Brooklyn Heights quickly became New York’s first “suburb.” Along its streets, located between Cadman Plaza and the East River, and south to Atlantic Avenue, rowhouses and churches were built, creating an elegant neighborhood that remains remarkably intact to this day. As the first neighborhood protected by the city’s Landmarks Preservation Law, numerous blocks of 19th-century architecture have been preserved—only a few contemporary buildings were able to sneak in before the district was established in 1965. In no small part, this signature character has helped Brooklyn Heights become one of the more desired zip codes in all of New York City.
Nearby Neighborhoods:
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History & Culture

Every block of Brooklyn Heights has reminders of the city’s past. From the pulpit at Plymouth Church, Rev. Henry Ward Beecher rallied abolitionists. On the eastern border, Borough Hall was the seat of the independent city of Brooklyn for the first 50 years of its existence until it merged into New York City in 1898. Walt Whitman walked these streets, Thomas Wolfe lived on Montague Terrace, and Bob Dylan memorialized Montague Street in song. If all of this inspires you to dive deeper into the borough’s history, the Brooklyn Historical Society is on Pierrepont Street. Along the western edge of the Heights, the Promenade has stunning views of downtown Manhattan and New York Harbor. Below the Promenade is the most notable contemporary addition to the area: Brooklyn Bridge Park is home to public art installations, family-friendly endeavors, facilities for the aspiring athlete, and an abundance of relaxing lawns.

Schools and Transportation

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Dine & Shop

The neighborhood’s main commercial artery lays along Montague Street, where your dining options trend toward time-tested favorites. Near or on the waterfront, you’ll be able to find a handful of beloved local chains, including multiple pizza places of high regard. On the southern edge of Brooklyn Heights at Atlantic Avenue, local establishments that have served the area for decades draw culinary enthusiasts from all over the city. Court Street’s businesses primarily cater to the lunch crowd, many of them working in the nearby civic buildings, taking a break from their posts. However, right over the border in Cobble Hill, Court Street’s dining and shopping options are a bit more enticing. Should you seek something the area cannot provide, subway service on several lines will link you to the serenity of Prospect Park and the vibrancy of Lower Manhattan.