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Get to know Potrero Hill

Potrero Hill is a neighborhood tucked away from the rest of San Francisco, a sunny district home to many longtime residents. The residential haven has the feeling of a small town but is alive with steady sidewalk traffic from dawn till dusk. Commercial strips run along 18th and 20th Streets providing shopping hubs where the neighborhood is packed with cafes, restaurants, bookstores, and bars around every corner. The steep streets are a price the locals are willing to pay for the sweeping downtown skyline views, reminding them they are indeed in San Francisco. And if you ask anybody in Potrero Hill where the crookedest street in the city is, they will point you in the direction of Vermont Street, where the neighborhood celebrates its curves with an annual Big Wheel Race. Potrero Hill is home to the San Francisco Design Center, a collection of showrooms serving as the go-to resource for home furnishings and accessories, and the Anchor Brewing Company, open to and supported by the community since 1896. Whether it is in the form of a small garden or flower box, every house seems to own a bit of green space. Potrero Hill is also home to sprawling public green areas including Jackson Playground, McKinley Park, and the Potrero Hill Recreation Center featuring a gymnasium, basketball and tennis courts, a baseball diamond, and kids play area. Potrero Hill is best described as a self-contained cohesive neighborhood where the people who live there enjoy spending all of their time.
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Living in San Francisco

San Francisco is one of the most naturally beautiful metropolitan areas in the world. It’s full of hills, thrills, and, for a surprising number of summer days, chills. It’s had a culture — and counterculture — of creativity from the day it was founded, and that has made it a world capital. For decades, almost any tectonic shift in global thinking — from farm-to-table cuisine to disruptive tech — has had its start here. Beauty and vitality and watery borders have made the city a precious place in terms of availability and cost, but that doesn’t stop people from chasing their own cable car dreams. San Francisco is very much a neighborhood-delineated city, and different areas not only have their own distinct cultures and architectures, but also unique geologies and even weather patterns. There are, of course, literal tectonic shifts here, and San Franciscans tend to take the shakes with only slightly worried amusement.

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